Food workers say they would rather starve than go back to work

Food workers have accused Donald Trump of sacrificing lives for profit after his executive order to keep processing plants open.  On Tuesday, the president used the Defense Production Act for meat packing facilities to stay open amid fears of a food shortage in the coronavirus pandemic.    But one Tyson employee, a Texas woman in her 30s, wrote on Medium: 'He says we're part of critical infrastructure, that we're essential workers. Well, I don't feel critical. I don't feel essential. I feel sacrificial.'  A number of plants across the country have been forced to shutter amid outbreaks of the coronavirus at the facilities. Many workers say they have been left without adequate protection in a close working environment.  But supply experts have warned 'last two weeks in May will be the peak of the meat crisis'. Victor Colello, a meat supervisor, told The New York Post: 'The plants that have remained open are only operating at 40 percent to 50 percent capacity.'  The anonymous Texas worker told Medium: 'This is about money. This is what they're always telling us: If the production chain stops for a minute, the company loses $700,000.  'This is about how if Tyson had to close to handle the virus, Wholesale Semi trucks they would have to pay us while we stayed home.' Workers are also threatening that they won't return to work, despite the order, and say their bosses profits have become the main priority.  'I'd rather starve and wait this out than go back to work', Menbere Tsegay, a worker at the Smithfield Foods plant in South Dakota, said.  Food workers have accused Donald Trump of sacrificing lives for profit after his executive order to keep plants open. Protesters are pictured in  Crete, Nebraska  Workers are also threatening that they won't return to work, despite the order Twenty meatpacking workers have died nationwide, and another 5,000 have been infected by the virus or shown symptoms of COVID-19, according to one union More than 800 workers have confirmed cases of COVID-19 at her workplace. Two people have died, and the plant has been shut down since mid-April.  Tsegay, a 35-year-old single mother of four children, added: 'Does it make sense to have meat in the markets if it takes the blood of the people who are dying to make it every day?
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